Students Against Violence Everywhere Youth Summit

Students Against Violence Everywhere Announces Youth Summit

Students Against Violence Everywhere, better known as SAVE, started at West Charlotte High School in Charlotte, N.C. in 1989 following the tragic death of a student who was trying National SAVEto break up a fight at an off-campus party. Students met first to console each other, then formed an organization to promote youth safety working together to prevent future incidents from occurring.

From that one high school chapter, SAVE has grown into a nationwide nonprofit – the National Association of Students Against Violence Everywhere, dedicated to decreasing the potential for violence in our schools and communities across the country. Today, more than 200,000 students are directly involved in SAVE programs at their middle school, high school and college chapters.

SAVE’s mission is to:

  • Engage students in meaningful violence prevention efforts within their schools and communities.
  • Empower youth with knowledge and skills necessary to provide service to their community and school.
  • Encourage positive peer influences within the school and community through violence prevention efforts.
  • Educate students about the effects and consequences of violence as well as safe activities for students, parents and the community.

SAVE was recently awarded a generous grant from The Allstate Foundation to aid local SAVE chapters at schools in North Carolina and Mississippi in promoting teen safe driving and youth safety efforts. Recognizing that the leading cause of death in teenagers is car crashes, SAVE and The Allstate Foundation seek to change that statistic by providing students the knowledge they need to make informed, safe decisions on the road.

SAVE and the Allstate Foundation, who first partnered together in 2005, are awarding the grants to 38 SAVE school chapters in the two states for use in their 2013-2014 plans. Thirty-three schools have been awarded grants to date, each of which receive a $1,000 mini grant for teen safe driving events and campaigns, free SAVE chapter membership, educational and promotional materials, an advisor stipend, ongoing support and assistance for SAVE’s youth safety efforts, and access to local Allstate agents to help further support the cause.

In addition to raising general awareness about teen safe driving, throughout the school year many chapters will host rallies, safe driving pledge events, seat belt checks, impaired driving obstacle courses and more. SAVE chapters are currently gearing up for the 25th Anniversary SAVE Youth Summit on April 12, 2014 at N.C. State University in Raleigh.

The Summit is a time for youth voices to be heard in workshops, peer-to-peer presentations and activities that Encourage, Educate, Engage and Empower youth to prevent violence and make their schools and communities safer. The event will address youth violence, bullying, gangs, dating violence, theft, social media safety, substance abuse, self-harm and teen driving safety . It’s a hands-on approach with motivating workshops, outstanding speakers, national awareness efforts and special presentations. In addition to students and adults directly involved with SAVE, other students, teachers and administrators are encouraged to attend, as well as law enforcement, community members, dropout prevention coordinators, social workers, counselors and parents. To learn more or to register, visit: http://nationalsave.org/25th-anniversary-save-summit-april-12-2014/.

For more information on SAVE or starting a SAVE chapter, visit www.nationalsave.org, or contact SAVE at (866) 343-SAVE to receive free start-up materials and guidance.

 

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Ten to Twenty Parenting was created as an honest resource for those of us parenting kids between the ages of 10 and 20. Our needs are so different and the issues much more complex than diaper rashes and playground tantrums.

Ten to Twenty

Ten to Twenty Parenting was created as an honest resource for those of us parenting kids between the ages of 10 and 20. Our needs are so different and the issues much more complex than diaper rashes and playground tantrums.

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